Grab your ankles

Yesterday, the Supreme Court of the United States of America ruled that it is legal for you to be strip-searched when arrested for any offense, however minor. Moreover, they did not limit the number of times you could be searched and apparently there is no need to even have just cause to conduct the search or searches.

Clearly, the justices have not read the Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution. For their benefit, I’ve included it below so they don’t have to page through a large law book.

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

You may have noticed that “persons” is the first thing listed that we should feel secure about.

A strip search is not conducted to keep the officer safe. It is intended as a humiliation tactic, to make you feel entirely powerless in the company of armed, clothed officers with badges. It is to search what rape is to sex. It is about power — complete, utter, dominating power — over another human being.

I’m not sure why what are supposed to be the best legal minds in the United States can’t see this glaringly obvious fact. I do wonder, though, if people now can be strip-searched, how can we strip-seach a corporation? Where is the anal cavity of a corporation?

The logic appears to be at odds. I’m beginning to think they are making this up as they go.

I can’t imagine what could possibly go wrong.

Send to Kindle
Tags: , , , , , , ,

About Rufus Dogg

I'm a dog who writes a blog. It is not a pet blog. It is a real blog that talks about real ideas. No, really. I do my own writing, but I have a really, really cool editor who overlooks the fact that I can't really hit the space-bar key cause I don't have thumbs. I talk about everything from politics to social issues to just rambling about local problems. And, sometimes I just talk about nothing in particular. Google+
This entry was posted in American Culture, Political thoughts, Pop Culture, Poverty, Serious Stuff and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Grab your ankles

  1. James Dibben says:

    un……believable

  2. Rufus Dogg says:

    Yup. Now every half-witted, under-educated, small town cop with a badge can legally humiliate you repeatedly in the confines of their jailhouse for something as slight as “showing disrespect during a traffic stop” and you have no recourse. These SCOTUS justices need to get out here in these scary small towns of America to find out what life is really like and how these grand rulings produce all these unintended consequences. To them, it is all legal theory. To the rest of us, it is the blunt end of a nightstick.

  3. James Dibben says:

    And I live in a small town that is exactly as you say. Several of the officers in this town carry quite the chip on their shoulders.

    Their abuse is well documented even among my relatively harmless friends.

  4. Remby says:

    This is what happens when you have a corrupt court appointed by elitist scum-bags like the Bush’s

    Goodbye to “American the Free”, hello to the “American 3rd Reich” !

  5. Rufus Dogg says:

    Remby, that might be a but harsh. I’d like to believe that GW was doing what he felt was the best he could to preserve and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and that he took that oath seriously. I think some people have a greater sense of the “wide arc” than others but I would not go so far as to call him a scum-bag.

    Same with the justices. Each has a point of view about what it means to uphold the constitutionality of a law. Some view the document with specific meaning whereas others see it is a living, breathing document. I do have issues with laws and rulings that ignore the human condition, however, which is what I think this ruling did. I think the justices did not fully consider the hubris that a badge gives small-minded men with power.

  6. margie clayman (@margieclayman) says:

    I’m not so sure it’s as cut and dry as that, Roof roof. The way PBS Newshour reviewed it, the argument for doing the strip search is based on cases like Timothy McVeigh, who was stopped on a traffic violation and ended up being the OKC bomber. Who woulda thunk a guy pulled over for a traffic offense could be so dangerous?

    The real problem with the case that went to the Supreme Court is that it seems the man was wrongfully arrested in the first place. He had paid his fees but his case hadn’t been crossed out.

    It’s all bummerific, but I don’t think it’s so black and white. My 2 cents 🙂

  7. Rufus Dogg says:

    Pre 9/11, I would have agreed with you. Post 9/11, we have seen laws that were intended for one purpose applied to cases way beyond the “spirit” of the law, but warped to do what some tin-pot lawman wanted.

    For example in the past several years, credit card companies have been suing people who were overdue, then swearing out a bench warrant when they don’t show up at the hearing. The sheriff then goes out to serve the warrant and they get thrown in county jail… on a CIVIL case.. for CREDIT CARD DEBT.

    When a HOA president swears out a complaint on me for walking my dogs in the middle of a cornfield that triggers the city to send out a police squad to my house to issue a warning… leash laws, in the middle of a cornfield.. in the middle of nowhere that happens to be just right inside the city limits…

    You may have more faith in people in positions of power than I, Margie.

  8. James Dibben says:

    My boss just spent a lot of time and a lot of money in a similar situation. She was turned in for animal neglect because her dog did not have any food.

    She argued….to no avail…..with the empty headed officer. She had fed him an appropriate portion in the morning. There was no food because the dog had eaten it all. The cop still wrote her a citation.