Fire for hire; the new public services

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firedollar Fire for hire; the new public services

I read a rather dry account of the last Union, Ohio city council meeting in the Dayton Daily News this morning. Nobody goes to these things and fewer people read the articles recapping them. But maybe we should start paying more attention. (I looked for the article online and could not find it, so I scanned it here and will replace with a link when it gets posted.)

Here is why we should start paying attention.

Fire and police departments are receiving less tax revenue and are set to receive even less for salaries when bills like SB 5 pass. But they are still expected to be on the other end of a 911 call. (I think the City of Englewood has a EMS charge, but not fire.) It appears the City of Union would charge for police, fire and EMS services; first to your insurance company and if they don’t pay, to you.

I understand subrogation and why sometimes it is necessary. But when someone calls 911, the last thing they should be thinking is; “Can I afford this call?” If their house burns down, and they are insured, the insurance company will replace it. If their house catches fire, the fire department comes out, and the insurance company will pay for repairs but not fire services, the homeowner could end up paying a whole lot more than the house is worth in fire-fighting fees.

I think the last thing we need is for a family to be sitting on the front lawn with a calculator, estimating how much a 911 call is going to cost and whether or not it is worth it.

In truth, though, what these laws will eventually do is increase insurance costs. The insurance companies will spread out the risk for everyone, charging people who live in Zip Code 45322 a bit more of course. And since insurance in America is a for-profit game, these additional fees will include the profit expectation a publicly-held company demands. These are also post-tax dollars, so they are about 33% more expensive than an income tax assessment would be to cover the additional cost of fire-fighting services for a community.

Government cuts are always nice, but when your income tax tax bill is cut and your total cost of citizenship rises, where is the savings to the citizens? It’s like buying a really cheap printer but paying hundreds of dollars a year in ink cartridges. Or a really cheap car that costs you the retail prices in repairs every two years. Or buying cheap processed food and paying more than quadruple in medical insurance premiums because your BMI is out of whack (assuming you carry insurance.)

Subrogation for essential emergency services is a very slippery slope. I know that the proposed ordinance is limited to “at-fault” incidents. Anyone who has ever been in an accident knows that at-fault is almost never a 100/0% split. In most instances, you are partially at fault simply because you were on the road. Clearly, if your house was not there, there would be nothing to burn.

Once you crack the door, it is easier to fling open wide.

I wonder what other public service will be next?

When the City of Englewood “saved” a million dollars.
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You wish you were Charlie Sheen

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CSHeadshot You wish you were Charlie Sheen

Admit it. You wish you were Charlie Sheen.

While you are shaking your head violently from side to side and stomping up and down disagreeing with me, just hear me out for a few seconds. Then you can go back to your ranting about why I am wrong, why Charlie is melting down, how he is bad for his kids, why he is anti-Semetic, a bad role model or any of the other pat sound bites the media are flinging around.

Ready? This stuff could be a bit deep. Or deep in it. I’m sure you’ll decide for yourself. **

Charlie admits his humanity. All of it. He says the “crazy” we think in our minds and acts on it.

Only this stuff isn’t so nutty. He is magic. He is a big star. He was born small and now he is huge. He has navigated the shark-infested waters of the entertainment industry and is smarter than most of the people he has come up against. He is special. He has a natural gift of poise and conversation. He got 1.2 million followers on Twitter before you even got out of bed this morning.

And he is not saying hateful things. He is just saying really, really brutally honest stuff. If we tag it as crazy then we can all feel better about ourselves. If we say he is crazy, we don’t have to deal with why we’re not living up to our potential. And if we go even further and start tearing him down, we’re morally superior.

He is getting away with all of this because he is operating within the bounds of the human condition. He knows down deep inside — way, way, way down deep inside of each of us — is a Charlie Sheen Dream that has been smashed down by years of following the rules and believing what others tell us about our inadequacies. There is always tomorrow. Next time. The next relationship.

Will you embrace your inner Charlie? Yeah, me neither. It’s too bright and scary out there.

You may now resume your lives. Or drop a comment below. Or unfollow me on twitter. Or unsubscribe from this blog. Whatever fills the ignored hole in your soul.

—–
** But I’m betting you won’t.

I was not going to write anything about Charlie Sheen. But then I got to thinking that Martin Sheen, his father, was born and raised in Dayton, Ohio. By extension, we invented Charlie. So naturally — as is our way here — we needed to claim the good things this invention brings to the collection of humanity. Just like we do the Wright Brothers, we plant a flag in anything that gets famous and claim it for our own.

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Posted in American Culture, Branding Thoughts, Clever Stuff, Creatives, Dayton Ohio, Just thinking out loud, Ohio, Pop Culture, Random Stuff, Serious Stuff, Social Media, Thinking out loud | Tagged , , , , , | 13 Comments

Destroying a legacy

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wall Destroying a legacy

Yesterday, we participated in the #letsblogoff about legacy. You can read all the articles submitted here. This morning, I opened the Wall Street Journal to this heart-breaking story of a legacy about to be erased from history. Apparently English teacher Thom Williams encouraged students at Marple Newtown High School in Pennsylvania to write on the walls. But the teacher died of cancer in December 2010 at the age of 63 and the school plans to repaint and renovate the classroom.

While the true legacy of Mr. Williams will always be the students he taught and inspired, there seems something wrong in being quick to wipe out years of written record so blithely, especially in a digital culture that seems intent on removing ink and physical medium and replacing it with transitory screens. Stories like this make me wonder why we are in such a rush to remove those quirky things that make us human and replace them with neat, orderly banality.

If the walls can not be preserved, we should at least make a record of it by photographing every square inch of the walls and recreate them on a memorial site or historical display at the school. To do less would be to marginalize Mr. Williams’ life and vocation.

Be creative, kids! Reach for the sky! You can win the future. But you’ll learn to do it in an environment of neatly painted institution-white walls.

PHOTO: Ryan Collerd for The Wall Street Journal. Please don’t sue me for using the photo. Thank you.

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What is legacy – a #letsblogoff post

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tiesthatbound What is legacy   a #letsblogoff post

At some point in my pursuit of an English degree at the University of Minnesota (it was the only college that let dogs in), I read the book The Ties that Bound: Peasant Families in Medieval England. It changed my perception of history and ultimately led me to a quest for the meaning of legacy.

I am still on that quest.

I used to think — like most people do — that history was made up of famous people who did great things and left legacies for historians to write about in textbooks and students to learn. When I was young and foolish, I wanted to be one of those people. During my youth, I strove to do big things and nothing I did was ever big enough to make it into the history books.

What I realized after reading Ties is that history is not made up of big men and women doing big things but regular-sized folk doing everyday things that — when strung together over a lifetime — were made into big things. The legacy was written afterwards by those who were left behind after realizing the effects of one’s life. Sometimes these were good things and sometimes bad. Sometimes they were intended consequences and other time unintended.

In the hands of a good storyteller, a person’s life could appear to be a thoughtful, well-planned vocation or an utter waste of time and life. In the end, though, no matter how famous a person was or how many great things he did, he did them one day at a time, one small task at a time. He was just lucky to have lived long and well enough to make a difference, good or bad.

So, what is legacy? I don’t really know yet other than what others say about you when you’re dead. Most of it won’t be true anyway but if enough people like or hate you, it will be a good story. Otherwise, it will simply be nothing but a short narrative on a coroner’s report.

I’m just hoping for the coroner who studied English and went to medical school because Harvard Law School rejected her. At least her report will have some flair and use big words.

*PS Read the book.. it is a fascinating look into how peasant families in the Middle Ages lived by how they died. Funny thing, humans haven’t changed all that much since.

This blog post is part of a blog-off series with a group of bloggers from different professions and world views, each exploring a theme from his/her world view. This was about “answering the question, “What is legacy?”” To explore how others handled the theme, check them out below. I will add links as they publish.

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You are a deadbeat piece of crap

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cheaphelp You are a deadbeat piece of crap

When did the United States of America go from “shoot for the moon” to “circle the wagons?”

We appear to be on a race to become the sickest and dumbest of the developed nations where nothing is going to be possible. The enemy this time is not the Communists, Soviets or al-Qaeda. The enemy is your deadbeat neighbor who is sucking your hard-earned money out of the tax coffers to finance his lavish lifestyle. He is buying big-screen TVs with his unemployment checks and taking extravagant vacations with his Social Security checks. If he is a teacher, he is enriching his pension plan from your sweat and aching back. If he works for the government, he is an over-paid lazy bum who is the reason your health insurance plan at the plant stinks.

Do we really want armed police officers and firefighters hired by municipalities at bargain-basement prices? How stupid and ill-trained do you want the teacher to be teaching your children? Have we abandoned the notion altogether that good schools increase property values? We seem to accept the argument without question from the Right that the public employees need to lower their expectations of compensation and the value of work rather than the private sector workers increasing their expectations.

Smart people are being driven out of politics by zealots and bullies under the mis-guided notion that small government is good government. But a small government that enables corporations to rape the human resources unchecked for the sake of profit only is not a good small. Even small government must be balanced.

The secret to getting cheap labor appears to be convincing everyone that they are not worth the salary or benefits they are asking. From the Tea Party to the GOP to the media, the message appears to be consistent — human beings are just too darn expensive.

Break out the torches and pitch forks, folks. We are turning against each other and it isn’t a healthy debate.

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How do we measure good things

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clicking How do we measure good things

I have an instinct that my random conversations and connections with people on twitter is a good thing, though I would be hard-pressed to find some measurement that says I’m right. I also know when I am clicking with someone in a conversation, though there is no “clickomoter” that confirms my intuition. I just know.

The same thing happens with good teachers. As a parent, you know when things are clicking. A student knows when s/he is inspired and s/he recognizes this as a good thing. Sometimes we are wrong, but on the whole, it doesn’t happen very often. Human beings are really good at reading each other. Unfortunately, we’re also pretty good at denying obvious sigs, but that is a whole other blog post.

Or other things like the feeling that a finely-crafted, leather-bound, hand-set book gives you as you run your fingertips gently along its spine. Or the welcome feeling of a cool breeze in the middle of a hot August day. Or the outstretched hand of a stranger when you fall on an icy sidewalk. All of these things are good, yet have no yardstick to measure them by.

And yet, we have CEOs who demand to know the ROI of a social media program in which the primary activity is connecting with others. Or school boards demanding to have some measurements for teachers’ results based on testing scores instead of the ability to inspire the soul of a young person. Or sites like Klout to give us all “influence” scores as if we already didn’t know how influential we were.

And this is all very, very silly.

I was watching some hearing on the Ohio Senate Bill 5 today and the congressman was doing some follow up questioning on someone testifying, asking her to give specific examples of this, that or the other thing. He really didn’t want an answer. Neither does anyone asking for an ROI of some social media program. Neither does anyone demanding to have measurement tests for good teachers. They are just looking for you to provide them permission to say no.

At some point along the way, we’ve decided that everything can be measured quantitatively. I think we are wrong. I think the qualitative measurements are just as important, if not more so. It is the part of our humanity that remains an art as the rest of us gets defined more and more by science.

The Wall Street Journal had an article this week about the computer, Watson winning on Jeopardy. Tons of people were producing commentaries on how computers are becoming smarter than humans. But they misunderstand the fundamental difference between the brain and how computers work. Computers make measurements the entire time while the brain.. well, creates art even during the most rigid of mathematical calculations.

This is why the unions will eventually lose the fight in Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. You can measure money. You can’t measure job satisfaction, happiness or human dignity. Not really. And if you can’t measure it, it must not exist.

Even though we all “know” it does.

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Passing on the magic

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surprise Passing on the magic

I was dropping off a friend at the airport early yesterday morning. As I was coming back to the parking garage, I had to cross the street and go through these large glass sliding doors.

I have gotten into the habit of waving my hand in front of me like Dumbledore in a Harry Potter movie to open automatic doors. My kids have grown tired of this gesture and think it is lame. Now, I think I do it just to annoy them, but it has become a silly almost involuntary habit.

As I was walking toward the door, I noticed this little boy on the other side of the doors standing about 3-4 feet away from his mom who was bent over doing something with her luggage. He was watching me intently like kids sometimes do.

I waved my hand like a wizard would and the door opened up as if by magic. His eyes got really big and he gasped. I immediately put my forefinger up to my lips and said “shhhhh” quietly as I winked. He put his hand to his mouth quickly as if to know we were supposed to share this little secret of my magic.

I slipped into the open elevator and was gone in a few seconds, as if also by magic the elevator wisked me away.

He will eventually tell his mom about the “magic man” at the airport and she will tell him to quit being silly. She will show him that the door opens up for anyone, not just a mysterious magic man with a graying beard dressed in a long black coat. I hope he doesn’t tell her for a while.

But until then, we will share this little secret that magic still exists in the most unlikely places and happens when you least expect it.

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Public employees and teachers are parasites

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Something is happening to our culture. The public employees who plow our streets, mow the lawns at our libraries, dig our ditches, snake out the gunk from our sewers and teach our kids how to read are becoming parasites on our economy. Their unreasonable demands for fair wages and benefits are killing jobs for you and me. We need to rise up, grab our pitchforks and torches, haul them from their houses and strip away their ill-gotten gains.

Or so a growing number of Republican governors and lawmakers would like us to believe, most recently, Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin. Joe Scarborough of Morning Joe said today that the public employees are being unreasonable by not caving into the demands, citing the States are “out of money” and that the private sector is making sacrifices so the public employees should too.

Only shouldn’t we be asking why the private sector has to make sacrifices to the tune of 10% unemployment, increased foreclosures, home values underwater, increased benefits cuts and wage freezes while large corporations have record profit years? Shouldn’t that be the real question?

We should not be seeking to lower public sector jobs to the level of private sector jobs, but seek ways of increasing the private sector to what the public sector now has that the governor is seeking to strip away. Once the protections are gone, it is just a matter of time before everyone sinks further down together.

How unskilled and underpaid do you want YOUR kid’s teacher?

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Where are the small businesses in all these economic recovery summits?

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200px Mark Zuckerberg   South by Southwest 2008   2 crop Where are the small businesses in all these economic recovery summits?

Apparently today, President Barack Obama will be meeting with Mark Zuckerberg from Facebook, Eric Schmidt from Google and Steve Jobs from Apple to discuss how the business community and government can work closer together.

Excuse me?

Apple, Google and Facebook are the business community? Where are all the small businesses that are supposed to be the backbone of this economic recovery? What could a 26-year old kid who built an empire of cards on a parasitic business model, a do-no-evil-but-dominate-the-world-anyway CEO who gutted newspapers and is about to topple the smart phone industry and a megalomaniacal evil genius possibly know about surviving and thriving in this economic disaster? That is like asking Eric Cartman to explain Phase II of the Underpants business or checking out eHow.com on becoming a multi-millionaire. (Hint: Step One; Start with a million dollars)

All Jobs cares about my business is he has sold me a Mac II, Mac IIvx, (2) Quadra 900s, (2) G3 towers, (3) iMacs in bondi blue, tangerine and grape, a Mac Mini and the latest iMac for the desktop, a Powerbook 170 and 165c, Powerbook G3 (Pismo and Lombard) (4) Powerbook 15″, (2) Powerbook 17″, (2) MacBookPro 13″ and a MacBookPro 17″, a MacAir 13″, (8) iPods, an iPad and (3) iPhones, a Newton, a MacPlus, 2 AppleTVs and 3 Imagewriters. All Zuck cares about my business is how many times I post to my blog, who reads it and how he can sell my data to anyone for the highest price. Eric Schmidt knows everything, down to the number of minutes all my employees take bathroom breaks, and I have no idea what he is doing with the data. I suspect not anything that will benefit my bottom line. But none of these guys really knows anything about building out a business in a down economy.

What President Obama really needs to do is assemble a group of middle-aged people who recently got fired and were scared sh*tless into starting their own companies just to avoid the bank taking their homes or their local church from casting them out for being shiftless, unemployed bums. Or a group of small manufacturers who had to mortgage their homes to make payroll when the banks called in their credit lines and lie awake nights wondering how to make the next payroll.

Get out of this bubble of big companies and ask us all out here how we are really surviving and thriving in this economic downturn. Ask us about the piles of forms we have to fill out every month just to stay in business. Ask us how the government can ease the strain of everyday worry on whether or not we are going to lose our health insurance before 2014 kicks in. Ask us not only about Federal regulations but State, County and Local ones as well (which, by the way, Mr. President, are much more onerous and closer to home than anything that comes out of Washington.)

Ask the small business owners who are making it through every day without giving up how they are doing it. I grant you, you will get a better picture of what doing business in America means much more accurately than meeting with the top “pop companies” of the moment.

Because for us, if we stumble, we’re not just losing a percentage point on our stock. When we stumble, we lose everything.

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Is it storytelling or curating? #letsblogoff

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storyteller Is it storytelling or curating? #letsblogoff
Jim Henson’s character “The Storyteller” and his dog. It is what pops into my head when I hear storytelling and it is the standard by which I measure all stories. Probably not fair, but it is what it is.

I wrote this earlier, but it applies now, so I republished for this #letsblogoff.

A while back, many bloggers decided they wanted to throw off the image of being one guy and his dog, hanging out in his parent’s basement ranting in his pajamas. They set about becoming “journalists.” And then that kinda didn’t set right because that was rather limiting their right of personal expression when they didn’t really have any facts and so they become “writers.” The latest metamorphosis for bloggers is to become “storytellers.”

Everyone now is a storyteller.

Only they are not really telling stories. They are curating facts. They are collecting events and regurgitating them. It’s the same thing they were doing as a blogger with a “new and improved” label stuck on the front only it is neither new or improved. The basic ingredients of storytelling are missing.

I recently received an invitation to Storify.com. They tout on their web site:

Turn what people post on social media into compelling stories.
You collect the best photos, video, tweets and more to publish them as simple, beautiful stories that can be embedded anywhere.

That’s not telling a story. That is assembling an exhibit piece for The Museum of Social Media. Bleckkkk.

If storytelling is not what most bloggers are doing, what is storytelling? I didn’t know myself until I received a tweet from @SaxonHenry this past Wednesday morning with a link to her blog. And with the following sentence, everything clicked.

Simply recording the boys’ actions wasn’t nearly enough! I had to determine how I would have responded to what they were doing. (I encourage you to read the entire piece.. after you get to the bottom of mine, of course.)

Saxon tells stories. I defy you to read this account of boys playing outside without feeling that film of grit between your skin and your sweat. Or read this poem and not smell the mix of old grease and pancake batter crisping at the edges, while getting an uneasy urge to run away from a life that has become banal and dull. Her choice of words, the cadence, the rhythm expresses her reaction to the story she is telling.

Jane Devin also tells stories. Her style is intense and many times uncomfortable but succeeds in ripping away a social mask that most of us have spent years affixing to our true faces. In her latest post, I defy you to read the entire post without choking back anger and a primal fear that you have been discovered for who you really are by those who have become the closest to you instead of the person you wish them to see. Jane’s choice of words, her intensely-packed paragraphs followed by a short, controlled release before she plunges you back with a half breath expresses her reaction to the story she is telling. It is almost like literarily waterboarding the reader.

In a culture where anyone can become a published author, claiming the title of a writer or storyteller without honing the craft is unfair to those who have. It cheapens their work. It disrespects their gift.

If you want to become a storyteller, then work to become one. Don’t just claim the title. Examine the elements of story by reading books like A Million Miles in a Thousand Years by Donald Miller. Watch episodes of The Storyteller. Watch the last scene of Mad Max, Beyond Thunderdome over and over. Read books by Joseph Conrad, John Steinbeck and Kate Chopin. Read Ben Zander’s book The Art of Possibility and watch his TED presentation. And read Jane Devin and Saxon Henry. Buy their books when published.

And tell stories. Lots of them. Like acquiring any skill worth holding on to, practice, practice, practice.

And while reading and listening to all of the materials I suggested above, think about why their stories work. And work to be as good as they are in telling a story that has your reaction embedded throughout.

Or stick to curating and leave storytelling to those who choose to reach beyond their five senses.

This blog post is part of a blog-off series with a group of bloggers from different professions and world views, each exploring a theme from his/her world view. This was about “answering the question, “What makes a good story?”” To explore how others handled the theme, check them out below. I will add links as they publish.

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Imagine this as the future of newspaper

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controlcenter Imagine this as the future of newspaper

I read yesterday’s Dayton Daily News today and they had a special section included. I don’t know where it is on their web site and I gave up trying to find it. I had hoped to point it to you as it is really cool stuff.

They have assembled all the COX Ohio Media in one facility and really decked it out with a bunch of studio space, digital equipment and tons of toys. I hope they give tours. But as I read the 10-page broadsheet-sized insert, I noticed a gaping hole in their media– no social media. Just newspaper, television and radio.

Oops. I hope that is just an oversight. If not, call me and let’s do business.

Here is what I think a newspaper/television/radio media company should do. Build out a social media center like they did at Gatorade (photo above) and staff it 24/7/365 with people authorized to reply back. Anytime anyone mentions Dayton on twitter, Facebook or blogs about Dayton, they know it. They know all the influential bloggers, the restaurant directories, the sporting events going on about town. They see tweets from people stuck on 35, wondering what the holdup is. They see a shout-out to a favorite restaurant or a blog post just published touting the really cool things about Dayton, Ohio. They see tweets from a frustrated bride three days from her wedding looking for a wedding photographer because the one she booked cancelled on her. They get behind movements to get Kroger to carry cheese curds.

And they would suggest advertisers quickly and authoritatively. And advertisers would get calls. And business.

And they see tweets when people are coming into Dayton for a family visit and welcome them back. They see birthdays on Facebook and send out tweets and updates wishing each a happy birthday. Maybe they even send out random cupcakes on that special day from a local bakery who advertises with Cox. In short, they act as the bar in the City Where Everybody Knows Your Name.

Can you imagine how many people Jeff Pulver would tell at his 140conf Conferences about the time he came to Dayton, Ohio to visit Hamvention and the local newspaper made sure his experience here was warm and inviting? That they tweeted him when he landed, asking if he needed a ride, maybe even tweeted his hotel to alert them he was in town? I wonder how many other people would like to visit Dayton, Ohio, just for the pampering experience?

You are a neighbor here in Dayton, Ohio, not just a resident. And in the process, we all connect just a little bit closer to each other and the outside world.

That is what I think a local newspaper can become. And for not a lot of money.

Postnote: 2011-02-21
Chris Brogan posted a video about the future of media. Here is one facet of my take on hyper-local.

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Not enough traction lately

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traction Not enough traction lately

I looked at my blog and realized I had not posted anything new since last Saturday. Who does that? Who sets up a blog with the intention of writing insightful, pithy posts about politics and life and such and then goes away for a week without posting anything?

Oh… you too?

Sorry.

It’s not that I haven’t had all sorts of cool things running through my head or whacked out opinions on stuff happening around the world and in our back yard, but it’s just that I have no traction for a 300 word rant. I found myself blurting out my opinion in a sentence or less and then nothing.

I can’t get enough traction on a single idea.

I sure hope it’s a phase.

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Football’s “Big Game” ads

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biggame 224x300 Footballs Big Game ads

On Monday, every blogger will turn into a marketing expert and analyze the ads from The Big Game* fifteen different ways in hopes that you won’t realize they don’t know crap about marketing or advertising. Several of them will actually know what they are talking about, but those people will be so non-confrontational that you probably won’t read them anyway.

Over here at the DogWalkBlog, we’re going to stick with what we know; dogs and dog-related accessories. Our entire criteria on judging the effectiveness of any Big Game ad is whether or not they have a dog in them. Then, we will list them further on down this page and tell you why we think they were cool or lame.

Fair enough?

Good.

*Super Bowl is a trademark of the National Football League (NFL) and DogWalkBlog did not pay any money for the rights to use it. So, we’re saying “The Big Game” (until the NFL clamps down on that one as well)

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What Kenneth Cole knows that you don’t

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kc What Kenneth Cole knows that you dont

He knows that if you are one of the bloggers and tweeters who are all up in arms about his use of the #egypt hastag in his tweet yesterday, you’re probably not one of his customers.

Why?

Because you scream at having to put up $60.00 for a quality WordPress theme. Or balk at a $20/month membership fee for anything more than freemium. And you think Chris Brogan is a sell-out and you think that open source should mean even the support is free. He knows that you are a cheap-butt user who demands free software and unlimited support.

And he knows that you are not going to spend more than $28.88 for a pair of shoes.

He knows that you are really not his market. His market doesn’t really know what a hashtag is and doesn’t really care. What they know is fashion. And hashtags don’t even register on their radar.

Who are all these people climbing all over the Kenneth Cole Facebook page in a fever to comment about what a horrible thing he did? Haters. But they are not his customers.

And he knows the more he is hated by the commoners, the more his customers will want to be just like him.

That is what Kenneth Cole knows.

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Winter and dogs

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Here are some “Winter and Dogs” photos taken during the storms of 2011, mostly because I have not posted photos in so long, but also because a crystal blue sky after a snow/ice storm is probably the most magnificent thing nature shows us.

Right behind a deeply colored rainbow in the summer after a rain storm.

It’s as if she is offering us an apology, which we always accept.

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Posted in Just thinking out loud, Photos, Pop Culture, Random Stuff | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off