What Ryan and Romney don’t understand about Medicare

Medicare Ryan Plan

Medicare Ryan Plan

Medicare is not about health insurance or health care. It is not about the money.

It is about security. It is about finally not having to worry about pre-existing conditions or getting kicked off a medical insurance plan. It is about not having to worry whether you are healthy enough to qualify for membership. It is about finally not having to pass some sort of test administered by a faceless, heartless insurance company review board.

It is about not having to lie and hide your real health issues to fool some hospital or doctor into treating you.

It is regaining your dignity as a human being.

It is about a release from the following things and more that you have suffered through the past 47+ years you have been working in a country that says it values you but only cares about how economically viable you are.

– The anxiety of being able to hang on to a job you hate but provides your health care.

– The anxiety that comes every October/November when the company you work for rolls out your benefits choices where your premiums and co-pays increase, your coverage shrinks and your doctor is no longer a choice on the plan.

– The anxiety every year when your individual plan you carry as a small business owner renewal date comes around and you hope that the letter is only a premium increase of 20-30% and not one that says they are dropping you because you went to the doctor last year for a bone scan or an MRI.

– The anxiety of hoping you will have insurance when the company merger is completed.

– The anxiety of not being able to take a day off to see the doctor for that cough that won’t go away because it could be cancer and if it is, you will need to use your company-provided insurance, get fired for some “performance issues” and then lose your insurance. The small comfort you feel because you will die knowing you did not cause extreme hardship on your family for not getting treated.

Paul Ryan and Mitt Romney will never feel any of that anxiety which makes it easy to tout courageous and bold decisions.

In the twilight hours of the day, the truth is your plan is neither bold nor courageous if your dog ain’t in the hunt.

How not to do customer service in the medical industry

Last summer, I developed some neurological symptoms that are more of an annoyance than anything. So I did what any responsible person would do; researched everything on the Internet and diagnosed myself into the worst possible case scenario. When that failed to cure up my symptoms, I went to see my doctor. He sent me to a battery of tests which were only limited by the amount of money in my bank account.

He could not come up with a diagnosis. Nor could a local neurologist. So, he shrugged and said, “I think you need to go up to the Cleveland Clinic and see what they think.”

Wow! These guys can make paralyzed people walk! Certainly they would have an answer. Or at least a wild guess. Or even a stupid notion. After some calls to my insurance company, clinic, etc., assuring me that things would be covered, I scheduled a day to drive to Cleveland and get poked and prodded and such. Long story short, they ended the day with the same perplexed head-scratching and “We dunno” diagnosis that my doctor gave me.

“But we need to schedule you in about 4 months for some more testing because we think you still have some money left in the bank. Would that be ok?”

Sure, no problem. Until I got their bill.

It turns out my wonderful insurance company discovered that Cleveland was not merely a suburb of Dayton but a whole other city outside my treatment area. They would reimburse at a much, much lower rate than they said. Sorry. You understand.

I didn’t. What could I do?

Call the clinic. Perhaps they can help.

They couldn’t. Or rather, wouldn’t. 90 days, Mr Dogg. You must pay the balance in full within 90 days. “But you guys didn’t actually do anything!”

It is not like I didn’t have the money or was unwilling to pay. I have been paying them; just not at the rate they wanted me to. I even sent them two letters explaining my payment plan with no response. As we were both disappointed in the visit results, I felt that we at least owed it to each other to share in our disappointment, to learn from the experience and grow together. To my surprise, they did not share my point of view and have since sent me to a “goon squad” over the last few hundred dollars.

Bummer.

So, I called them this morning. Surely, they would see the folly of their mistake and call off the goons. Again, I was very, very wrong. I had forgotten for a brief moment that I was not their customer. My insurance company was their customer. How happy or disappointed I am was irrelevant to them.

I will pay them in full eventually. But instead of them this week, I will pay my landscaper. He has not disrespected me. Maybe I’ll pay them next week.

But this little story should not go without a lesson to be learned by the medical industry. After all, you guys will be getting more and more business from us as we all get older and need more care. Health insurance companies are kicking us off plans left and right, employers are jettisoning full-time people in favor of two part-timers they don’t have to pay benefits for and Congress is cutting Medicare. You should probably learn to handle us a little bit better, or at least with some more flexibility. Tightening the deadlines and being quick to send bills into collections rapidly is short-sighted at best. It is not a sustainable strategy.

And then you have folks like me who just shrug and say, “I was gonna pay them today, but I’ll just wait a bit longer.” In truth, if the Cleveland Clinic let me say my piece without being being hard-nose pricks, they would have had their money today. Bummer that, too.

So, with that goal of keeping us both in business, I have some feedback you may want to take to heart.

What you say:
We printed the payment terms on your statement.

What we hear:
You dumbass. Can’t you read the crap you put on your bill with edge-to-edge printing? It’s your fault you are in this mess. We told you 90 days, damn it. Did you think we were kidding? We are an unfeeling, inflexible cold-hearted corporation that needs money paid on time, you deadbeat.

What you say:
Would you like to talk to a supervisor?

What we hear:
I’m getting tired of talking to you and will give you to someone who has no heart and is immune to anything you have to say. He will be a bully to you and will belittle your concerns. At the end of the conversation, you will not only not get any concession from us, but you will feel like a worthless piece of crap.

What you say:
According to the terms of your contract…”

What we hear:
I have stopped listening to you a long time ago and think that you are just too stupid to even be able to read.

What you say:
I can adjust the terms, but I won’t.

What we hear:
I am an arrogant prick. I have power over you and I will wield it without mercy, you piece of crap.

After all is said and done, we all know you are a business. We know that you hold all the cards. We know you can wreck our hard-fought FICO Score with one keystroke. We do not need to be reminded that we are merely walking wallets to you. What we would like to believe is that we have a personal relationship with you, with our doctors. We want to believe you care about us as a whole person, not just our ability and willingness to pay.

If you can’t fix what ails us physically, can you give us that one little lie at least?

AFTERTHOUGHT
It occurs to me that the supervisor I spoke to this morning failed miserably at his job. He got so caught up in his own ego with proving me wrong that he forgot his primary job was to collect money for his employer, The Cleveland Clinic. It occurs to me also that I now have the upper hand in this arrangement as I and the collection agent are in a position to cost CC money they would have had to spend by working directly with me. The direct cost of ego is the fee the collection agency will charge CC. I wonder what sort of deal the collection agent will make with me? It’s now worth a phone call. Are stubborn, combative people in your customer service department costing your company money? Bet they are.

*I don’t mean to pick on the Cleveland Clinic specifically. They were just the organization in my experience. But they did hire some pretty heartless, unempathetic people in their patient financial department who could maybe use some sensitivity training. But, maybe it’s working for them. I won’t ever go there agin, but that should in no way affect your decision to see them if you want. In truth, all these hospitals are getting like that. I won’t go to one local hospital for services any more simply because they start the harassing calls on day 31. There is another hospital across town that waits at least until day 60 to start calling. And they are nicer people.

.

Crazy like a Weiner dog!

On May 24, 2011 Anthony Weiner rose to speak in the US House of Representatives on the issue of Medicare and was basically told to sit down and shut up by the GOP chair. You can watch the video here on C-SPAN Minute 5:13:40 (I love that site!)

It took me a few days to figure out what he is doing and he is either really dumb or just crazy; crazy like a weiner-dog.

I don’t believe Weiner sent a picture of his crotch on twitter nor do I believe he actually engineered this. But here is what I think occurred to him at some point.

“I can use this thing to suck the oxygen out of the news cycle for a few days. Shut me up, will you GOP? HA!”

So he goes out and says, “I didn’t do it,” “I’ve been hacked,” etc, etc. Then when asked directly if it was a photo of him or not, he drags the media through another cycle by specifically not denying it was him. He knows they will spend a day speculating on why he is being coy. Then, maybe he comes out and says, “Ok, ok, it is me. Sue me, I got a big wiener.” OR he denies it emphatically after the advice of his lawyer.

And the media will spin it up another day, speculating on why a Congressman would take a photo of his own crotch OR why he just didn’t come out and say it wasn’t him.

Clever. Three days minimum of clever.

Or I’m entirely wrong.

Either way, I still like how he fights back!