How to look clueless on Twitter in three easy steps

Recently, one of the folks I follow sent out a tweet about a teacher who is selling sponsorship on the bottom of his test. The tweet went like:

I am in advertising, but even I think this is a bad idea.

So, being a good follower, I click on the link to the story, read it and replied back something like:

Wow, I want to advertise. Do you know how to get in touch with Tom Farber?

A day goes by and the reply comes back from my follower:

Who is Tom F?

I replied he was the teacher in the story he tweeted out. He replied back:

Not sure, use Google!

Oh, ok. I was a bit taken aback, but maybe he was very busy, a day job, thousands of followers and didn’t really have time to engage me. Nope. He is following 32 people.

So, here is my take on Mr. Follower.
He really didn’t read or engage in the article, but he thought he should tweet something out that made him look like he was connected with the advertising/marketing world. When he was given an opportunity to engage with someone who took the time to reply to a tweet, he blew it entirely by saying, “I don’t have time for you, look it up yourself.”

I clicked through to Mr. Follower’s profile and then to his web site, which turned out to be a resume. His last job ended in September 2008, so it looks like he is searching for a new job. Do I have a marketing position for him with my company? Maybe I do, but I would never hire him.

Am I being too hard on Mr. Follower? Perhaps. Perhaps I should do my own research on articles that interest me. Or, perhaps Mr. Follower just failed the first test of a prospective employer looking for a Web 2.0 savvy person to lead a multi-million dollar division.

Oh, yeah, the three steps thing… umm, ok:
1. Make sure you don’t actually read or engage in web sites you tweet out
2. Treat every question like it is an imposition on your time
3. Don’t bother helping anyone. That is what Google is for.

Artificial time dividers

500 Tweets
500 Tweets
Today, I reached 499 tweets on my Twitter account and wanted my 500th tweet to be something special. It was and it wasn’t, as it was co-opted by Alltop to blast out a new feed page using TwitterFeed.com. That’s ok; Guy and Neenz are good folk and I don’t mind.

Got me thinking about all sorts of other “artificial” time periods we use to trick our minds into stuff. Here are a few of mine:

  • Thanksgiving is the start of the official Holiday Sloth season where I no longer need an excuse to not get something done.
  • 29th birthday to 30th
  • 30th birthday to 40th (we won’t go further)
  • Every New Year. This time, I’ll be more organized, less frivolous, more, blah, blah
  • Oh, well I ate that Snickers bar. I’ll get serious about the diet tomorrow.
  • I can pay bills tomorrow. Today is already shot and the post office is not open anyway.

The truth is, however, that time does not see any of these dividing lines. It keeps marching on and so what we see between age 29 and age 30 is just a fraction of a second — maybe less — to time.

So it is with my 500th tweet. Is the 500th any more or less special to the person who got it? Should it be more special to me? Should I have saved it for that one special tweet to that one special follower?

I dunno. Don’t think it matters much because I’m now working on my 1000th tweet. That one will be really special.

Half the failure Guy is

My dream is to become only half the failure Guy Kawasaki is!

http://www.rivershark.com/x/47

I still have not written the two books banging around in my head. But, I figure if I blog almost every day, that kinda counts?

Love that “big pile of nothing.” To misquote Emily Dickinson very badly, “I’d rather be sitting on my own big pile of nothing than at the bottom of a big pile of Yahoo!”

That “big pile of nothing” gets me traffic and Twitter tweets! Keep on doing nothing, Guy!

 

Posted by email from rufus’s posterous