The creative spark

morning-star

This weekend’s ear worm is Karen Carpenter’s version of Rainbow Connection, specifically this verse:

Who said that wishes would be heard and answered when wished on the morning star?
Somebody thought of that and someone believed it, and look what it’s done so far.

Someone was first with the idea that if he wished on a star and believed, that his wish would come true. He created this idea from two disparate objects — a wish and a star — out of nothing other than his imagination. At some point, he shared his fragile idea with someone else. And that someone else had a choice to either embrace it as a fantastic idea and fan it… or belittle it, ridicule it and kill it.

In that ever brief moment, the spark of a creative idea took hold. It was fanned with nothing more than a human belief that could not be verified. No ROI was produced, no matrices were created to measure against; just a spark of human thought against the wonder of the world that surrounded the thinker.

While frantically running errands on Thursday afternoon before our industrialized world decided that it would shut down at 5:00pm, I caught the middle of a discussion on NPR where a guest was talking about how music and arts are being systematically removed from school curriculum in favor of more STEM classes to comply with No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top. (I can’t find the program; npr.org stinks as a curation site.) What we are doing is creating generations of human beings who do not value art or music.

What we are losing is the ability to create, recognize and fan the spark of creativity.

I’m going out right now and wish really hard on a star. Join me.

Enjoy the video.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYuE2roIkH0

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About Rufus Dogg

I'm a dog who writes a blog. It is not a pet blog. It is a real blog that talks about real ideas. No, really. I do my own writing, but I have a really, really cool editor who overlooks the fact that I can't really hit the space-bar key cause I don't have thumbs. I talk about everything from politics to social issues to just rambling about local problems. And, sometimes I just talk about nothing in particular. Google+
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6 Responses to The creative spark

  1. Saxon Henry says:

    I’ll be on my terrace tonight wishing on one, Rufus, even if the thunderstorms cover them over! Nice post! Thanks for bringing this to consciousness…it is so needed right now.

  2. James Dibben says:

    Can we add PE to the prayer list?

    My twelve-year-old literally needs exercise to maintain a healthy mental state. Our school now only does PE one semester per year.

    Forcing kids to sit still for 7 hours and just absorb data is a stinky plan. Our school spends the whole year training for one stupid state test. They might as well not even go to school after the test is given. It’s obvious many of the teachers feel the year is over once the week of testing is complete.

  3. Rufus Dogg says:

    YES!! The Ancient Greeks were all about a healthy mind inside a healthy body. We need to recognize that the mind is attached to a physical body that needs nourishment and exercise in order for it to function properly. (Skeptics: Stephen Hawking is probably more of an exception than a rule… but think how much more he could get done if more able-bodied.) I know I write better after a walk and when I’m not in some nagging pain somewhere….

    We have that same test in Ohio.. Mid March, school is done.. everything from then on is just filler…

  4. Rufus Dogg says:

    We need art, music, dreams, imagination… it is what separates us from the impulse-driven animal world.

  5. James Dibben says:

    I’m the same way with my writing. The longer I sit in front of my PC the less creative I am. Get me walking or even mowing the yard and the ideas flow.

    Great example with Hawking.

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